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Do you want to master your time and become more productive? Do you find yourself getting lost in endless distractions? Do you find that you’re busy, but you never seem to get anywhere?

Travis Baird is a mindful productivity coach and he joins me on this episode to share his insights on how to master your time and become more productive by using very simple mindfulness techniques. Whether you’re an A-type workaholic or someone who is an amazing procrastinator, or a mix of both, there’s something for you in this episode.

We discuss:

  • Why improving your productivity habits matters
  • How to avoid burnout when you’re a workaholic
  • How mindfulness can solve your productivity issues
  • The importance of clarifying what needs to be done
  • What are common distractions?
  • Having a schedule that suits your needs
  • GEARS method for productivity.
  • G – Goal. Set one a day only.
  • E – Events. What appointments do you have?
  • A – Actions. Your to-do list for the day.
  • R – Rest. Set an intention for a time to finish
  • S – Satisfaction. What’s one thing you are going to do today just because it’s fun for you?
  • What are the common mistakes people make?
  • How to make time to be mindful and productive

More about Travis Baird

Travis Baird is a mindful business coach, speaker, and founder of Mindful Productive where he helps ambitious professionals to get the clarity, confidence, and control they need to do their best work without burnout or overwhelm.  

 Travis has enjoyed speaking at San Antonio Entrepreneurship Week, Selena Soo’s Instant Authority Mastermind, and at numerous universities. Travis is a featured teacher on the popular apps Insight Timer and Sanity & Self. He lives in San Antonio with his wife and four cats. When he’s not coaching, you can find him running on trails around San Antonio, baking bread, or playing the viola. 

Visit MindfulProductive

 

TRANSCRIPT:

Renee:

Welcome back to Leveraged and Loving It, I’m Renee Hasseldine, and on today’s episode we are joined by Travis Baird who is all the way from San Antonio, in Texas. I’m so excited. I think you’re my first Texan on the show.

Travis:

I’m so excited to be here, Renee. Thank you so much.

Renee:

And for those who are just listening to the podcast and not seeing video, Travis has a very cool hipster beard. So, I’m like, “Ooh, hipster Texan.” Awesome. So, listen we’re not here to talk about Travis’s beard today though. We’re here to talk about how to make those unfocused mornings, derailed afternoons, and blurred workday boundaries, a thing of the past using mindfulness productivity systems. So thank you so much for coming to talk about this because I know, intimately, my audience and I know that we’ve all been guilty of, here Renee picks up her mobile phone, scrolling, scrolling, scrolling, and getting lost in the day and going, “What? Where did the day go and what have I actually done with it?” So thank you so much for joining me to talk about this very important topic.

Travis:

Oh yeah. I’m really excited to talk about it. It is obviously one of my favorite topics too, and something that I personally struggled with a lot for a long time. So if you’re in that spot where you feel like there’s nothing you could possibly do to break out of this habit, trust me. You can. It’s going to be okay.

Renee:

Okay. So tell us then, let’s kind of do this Watson all exposé. What was, what were you like at your worst when you were not productive?

Travis:

Oh my gosh, at my worst. Well actually, at my worst, I was productive, but at a level that was utterly unsustainable. So I am very much a recovering workaholic, recovering perfectionist. So there would be two extremes. One end of the extreme would be I would work way beyond my limits, just pushing it. If I had more work to do, I would keep working. I wouldn’t rest. I wouldn’t bother with sleeping or spending time with friends. None of that. I would just work.

Renee:

Guilty.

Travis:

Yeah, exactly. If anybody’s listening and you’ve done that, you’re not alone. But what that would lead to is I would get a lot of stuff done. I would make progress toward my goals. It was great, but I would consistently run into an experience with burnout. And it really came to a head about five years ago now, where I reached this point where I was just constantly chronically fatigued, and just negative about my work, I didn’t care about the work I was doing anymore. And so it went from being extremely, extremely productive, in an unsustainable way, to where I couldn’t get anything done because I was totally burnt out. So the worst, I guess to answer your question, the worst version of me was someone who just did things constantly until they couldn’t anymore. So they were working and then they would have to stop. And that’s not fun.

Renee:

Yeah. No, no. And I’ve been there and I know that very well, and I often joke about this, you know. I’m going to say this is because I’m so self-aware, is that I have two modes. I have steam train mode, which is go, go, go, go, go and look out anyone if you’re on the sidelines, you will get run over. And then I have totally chilled, I’m doing nothing and I’m a couch potato. I’m one or the… My version of moderation is to swing wildly between those two extremes. Yeah.

Travis:

I hear it. Yeah, that sounds very familiar. And yeah, I mean it’s one of those where the two extremes are not necessarily bad as long as you can find a way to navigate between them and feel okay. It only turns into a problem when you get stuck at one end or the other.

Renee:

Yeah. Yeah. So, all right, let’s talk about, so what does mindfulness have to do with solving this?

Travis:

Okay, that is a great question. It’s the question really. So like a lot of folks, as I just mentioned, I was always great at working very, very hard, but not really paying attention to what I was doing and if it was actually relevant to my goals, what I believed in, if it was within alignment with what I wanted to do. And so I was productive in a classical sense, but I wasn’t moving the direction I wanted to go. At the same time I had learned about mindfulness, probably I guess now it’s been a decade or so now that I’ve been studying mindfulness and practicing, and it clicked one day that if I could apply this concept of nonjudgmental awareness in my daily life, then something might shift in terms of how I worked and maybe that I wouldn’t have to be a workaholic. Maybe I could work in some other way.

So what I discovered was that when I work with mindful, nonjudgmental, intentional action, I’m much more able to do the work that I need to do, the work that’s important, while still taking care of myself. Which means crucially seeing which things are not important, which things do not need to be done. To be able to see, okay, this is my thing that I need to focus on. This is where I’m placing my focus. These other five, 10, 15, 20 things are not, they’re distractions. And when those distractions come up, I can see them and let them pass. So ultimately what it leads to is I have the clarity that I need and the confidence that I need to run my business the way that I need to, that aligns with me.

Renee:

Yeah. Yeah. So, okay. Give us some examples of some of those distractions.

Travis:

Oh, okay. Great. So let’s see. Some of my favorites… Obvious ones that come up first, social media in general is a tricky one, especially… I know a lot of listeners may use social media for their business. So it is a little tricky when there are work things you might do on Facebook or Instagram. But then when it just turns into non, totally unaware scrolling forever and ever and ever, that’s an obvious distraction. But other less obvious things come up a lot. For example, pursuing a business goal that has nothing to do with what you actually want to do, but just because somebody else told you you should do it. So if somebody says you have to write a book, so you write a book. Books are great. There’s nothing wrong with writing a book, but if it doesn’t align with your business, not so much. Same with doing one on one coaching, what I do. People say, “Oh, one on one coaching is great,” but if you hate one on one coaching, if you hate talking to people, do not become a one on one coach. It’s not worth it. It will be miserable. So lots of business goals can turn into distractions that take up a huge amount of time and energy. And when we don’t see them as such, then we get drawn down these paths where we just-

Renee:

Yes.

Travis:

… work ourselves into nothing.

Renee:

Yeah. Yes. Yes. I’ve got another example of that Travis. Because I mean I know for me the way that I work best in my business is always when I’m having fun. And when I’m having the most fun it’s generally when I’m working with clients, running half day workshops, I love running my half day workshops, and I can do that on Zoom now, which is fantastic. And what I realized, because I burnt out in May this year after doing my sixth national tour, and I, that was like the steam train crashed, and it was off the rails. And so it took a while for my team and I to rebuild the train. So in between we spent some time trying other strategies because I crashed and I was like, “Okay, well this isn’t, I can’t do this anymore. We need to find something else to work.”

 

And we did a whole bunch of stuff that we know hasn’t even worked in the past, but we thought, “Hey, let’s try it again,” because we like beating our heads against a brick wall. Let’s try Facebook ads, let’s try running automated webinars. Let’s try doing all these automated funnel things because other people say it works and it probably works for them. Let’s, if it works for them, why won’t it work for me? And so we did, we spent a whole heap of time, my whole team, and we’re invested in doing this stuff, which in the end was distractions because it doesn’t work for me. It doesn’t play to my strengths. And it just, it’s never worked before and for whatever reason it’s not the right strategy for me and my business. And then we’ve just come back to running half day workshops on Zoom and going, “Oh yeah, this is the thing that does work.” And we just got distracted for a few months. But that’s, hey, that’s business.

Travis:

Yeah. Well and it’s amazing how, I mean, you came back to the simplest answer. The thing that, I imagine for you it’s probably very easy, and it’s one of those where a lot of us, a lot of business owners, we get to a place where we think it has to be difficult. We think it has to be complicated when a lot of times simple is often, not always, but often better than complicated. And removing the complexity is usually better than adding complexity, if you can do it. The thing is it’s hard to do that. It takes a lot of focus and awareness and deep internal work to get to where you can easily do that.

Renee:

Yes.

Travis:

That doesn’t mean you can’t do it though.

Renee:

I’m so excited to talk to you about this today because it’s just yesterday that I created my new weekly schedule for 2020, and can I tell you what it looks like, because I’m just like-

Travis:

Oh, yes. Please.

Renee:

It’s the most amazing it’s ever looked. Monday, so I work during school hours, during school terms, right? So all of this happens while the kids are at school. So Mondays, personal training and then team meetings and internal meetings. So my accountant or my coach or whatever, right? That’s Mondays. Tuesdays create, think, play.

Travis:

Hmm. I love it.

Renee:

Yeah.

Travis:

Oh my gosh. Play is in there. That’s great.

Renee:

Yes. Wednesdays are for either half day workshops, but that’s only once a month so it’s not every Wednesday, or recording podcasts. I can say that. Or if I’m not, it’s not a podcast or a half day workshop day, it’ll be for play. Thursdays are for client calls and personal training, and Fridays are for my Authority Accelerator clients. That’s it.

Travis:

Oh that’s beautiful. I love it.

Renee:

How chilled is that?

Travis:

Oh so chill. Yeah that’s amazing.

Renee:

Do you feel relaxed just hearing that?

Travis:

I feel very relaxed. No, I mean it’s so great. I mean having a schedule that suits what you need and doesn’t add a bunch of stuff unnecessarily. I will say it’s funny because I had a client recently that I finished up with who, she had a schedule that was like that but… and this is the key thing that I know you won’t do because you’re way along on this, but she had the schedule, it was this very nicely lined up, each day is this thing, each day is this thing, but then she would also, if she had any free time, if there was any moment that wasn’t filled, she would immediately fill it in with other things. So if she would have a time period that was intentionally about resting, or playing, or just exploring possibilities, if she had a lull in that, then she would immediately go into social media marketing or something totally, she would just fill in the space.

Renee:

Wow.

Travis:

And so the challenge is, for those of us who are very type A people, to really honor that you did the work to create this schedule. So stick to it. Like really, really honor it. Anyway, I was excited. I’m sure it’s-

Renee:

Yes. So have you got some hot tips then, for people who when they go, “When I’m going to hit my Tuesday, and I hit it and it’s like, woo hoo, it’s time for play.” How do I avoid that tendency to… Because, yeah, those of us who are high achievers, doers, it’s easy to fall back into that habit. What can we do instead?

Travis:

Yeah, so one of my favorite habits that I use is, actually it’s basically a morning routine that I developed for this particular challenge and it’s called GEARS. I’ll outline it really quickly. It’s, you might want to experiment with this.

Renee:

Yeah, yeah. I know it.

Travis:

So…

Renee:

I like an acronym. Is it an acronym?

Travis:

Yeah, it’s perfect.

Renee:

Okay, good.

Travis:

So with GEARS-

Renee:

Renee is writing notes.

Travis:

Oh yeah. Awesome. Awesome. Get your pen. So with GEARS, it basically, the idea is that before you start working each day you go through this five step process and you just answer, what are these things for each of the letters? Okay? That doesn’t mean you have to do it first thing in the morning when you wake up, you can just, whenever you start working, whenever that is, if it’s 10 at night when you start working, totally fine. So the first thing is G stands for goal, and that’s just one goal. Singular goal, not plural goals. But if there was one place that you could place your energy today, where would that be?

 

Or if you like more of the kind of essentialism approach to thing, the one thing approach to things, then you might say, “If there was one thing I could accomplish today, what would that be?”

Renee:

Yeah.

Travis:

But however you want to think of it.

Renee:

Great.

Travis:

Sometimes it’s not easy to answer that question at the beginning of the day, right? It is if you have a plan, but if you don’t know for sure, you can always come back and do the goal at the end. So then after goal, the E stands for events. This one’s the easiest, most boring part of the whole thing. So, but stick with me here. So the events are just literally the times that you have appointments in your calendar. So they’re things that have a time attached to them. So not to do list items, but actual appointments that you have to go to at that time.

 

So just writing, okay, 9:00 AM I have this thing with this person, 10:30 I have this thing, all that. Now that’s crucial because then you use that knowledge, that awareness of what’s already filled in to go to A, which stands for actions. And this is basically your to do list items, right? So going through and saying, “Okay, what are the things I want to do today?” Now important note here, GEARS is for one day only, just that day. Do not make it for the week. Do not make it for a month ahead, just for that single day. What are the actions I want to focus on? And maybe, I would encourage you if you’re like me and maybe like Renee, if you tend to like to do a lot of things and over commit yourself to stuff, make that list as short as you possibly can.

 

So you can always add more. If you finish everything on your actions list, celebrate and then add a couple more things if you want. Or finish your day and just go take a break. That’s also fine.

Renee:

How good does it feel ticking things off a list though?

Travis:

Yeah.

Renee:

That’s one of my favorite feelings in the world.

Travis:

It’s so great. And if you already have a big master to do list, you can use this in conjunction with that. Okay, so that’s A. Then R-

Renee:

Which is Asana for me.

Travis:

Yeah.

Renee:

Everything’s in Asana.

Travis:

Oh yeah. And Asana’s really great. And you can use this in Asana too. You can use this structure in there. I use it in Trello, but anyway.

Renee:

Yeah.

Travis:

So then the R in GEARS stands for rest. So important. So if you have a day that you’re looking at, if, so let’s say you’re starting your workday and you know you are going to finish at 5:00 PM on the dot. Then cool. Put that in there. I’m going to finish working at 5:00 PM. If you don’t know for sure when you’re going to finish, then just make an educated guess, set an intention, I’ll finish work at whatever time it is, 8:00 PM, 10:00 PM, 2:00 AM, 10:00 AM, it doesn’t matter what time it is, whenever that is. And then when that time comes, it gets much easier to step away, to be able to separate and say, “Okay, I have permission to stop now. I’ve done enough.” And then S, the S in GEARS stands for satisfaction.

Renee:

Ooh.

Travis:

Yes. So this is-

Renee:

I feel like you need to start singing for me.

Travis:

Oh my gosh. Later we’ll do some singing. So with-

Renee:

Is that a promise?

Travis:

Maybe, we’ll see. So with satisfaction, this is really important for burnout prevention longterm. The thing that most of us do when we get it locked into just work mode all the time, is we stop listening to what we need and what we want. We start just doing what everybody else wants and needs, exclusively, right? So this is a very small way to say, “Okay. Today, what is one thing that I’m going to do just because I want to? Or just because it makes me feel good, or just because I like it.” You phrase it however you want, but something that is intentionally just because you want to, not for somebody else. Or if you have a hard time with that, you can do it for me, Travis. You can imagine I’m doing this to make myself feel better because Travis suggested it. That works too. But, no honestly-

Renee:

Do you want me to send you a message when I’m sitting here watching a movie just for you Travis?

Travis:

Yes, please. Oh my gosh, yes. Everybody flood my inbox with messages about the things you’re doing because you enjoy them. That would make me so happy. I would feel so glad to have that.

Renee:

Yay. My current go-to actually is, my family and I are learning to go, we’re going to Indonesia for a year in 2021 and we’re all learning to speak Indonesian. So we’ve got our Duolingo apps and yeah, that’s our kind of, that’s kind of play time for us.

Travis:

Oh, that’s amazing. That would be incredible playtime. I know zero words in that language, so that would, man, that sounds amazing. But okay, so applying GEARS for helping with this challenge of, okay, you have a set schedule in mind. If when you’re starting the day you know okay, today I’m going to play. That’s the goal. Then, and putting that under G for GEARS, my intention today is to play. And then as you go throughout your day, anytime that you start getting off of that, you can come back to it and say, “Oh, my goal for today is actually this. It’s to play. It’s not to do social media marketing or something else.” It’s to focus here.

Renee:

Yeah.

Travis:

And that way you can keep coming back. It gives you a point of focus.

Renee:

Yeah, make play the goal.

Travis:

Yeah.

Renee:

There you go. For all the rest of you overachievers, is your brain melting right now? What? You mean play can actually be a goal?

Travis:

Oh yes. Play can be a goal. Rest can be a goal. It’s, yeah, it’s hard to do for some of us. Those of you for whom you’re listening to this and you’re like, “Oh yeah, that sounds easy.” Awesome. This is still a really good tool, but for those of you who are like, “Oh man, this sounds horrible. This sounds like the worst idea ever.” This is for you. This is going to help you even more than everyone else.

Renee:

Yeah. Yeah. If it’s making your skin crawl, maybe it means you need to look at it.

Travis:

Oh yeah.

Renee:

Yeah. Yep, yep. Awesome. All right. And one of the mistakes that you find people generally make, when they start to kind of think about, okay, I’m going to be more mindful and more productive about, and let go of those distractions… What comes up for people when they’re kind of, they start to implement this stuff. Where do they come off the rails?

Travis:

I think one of the first things that happens is people feel like it has to be perfect, and maybe I’m projecting a little bit because I am admittedly a perfectionist. I started that off, started off our conversation today with that. But I think a lot of folks feel like it either has to be perfect, that I’m perfectly focused, that I never get distracted, that I always do the right things, or I’m a failure, I can’t do any of it. Right? So the key is really in finding a place where it’s okay to experiment, and it’s okay to try, and to put an intention somewhere. And if it doesn’t work, to be able to see that and say, “Okay, I see that this didn’t work out as I planned. I see that I accidentally spent an hour scrolling through Facebook when I meant to do this other thing, but I can acknowledge that and now choose where to place my focus next.” So that’s, it’s really the continual returning, where the first time getting derailed, staying derailed, being able to say, “You know what? I don’t have to feel any guilt or shame about this. I can just see it, let it go, come back to my point of focus, or choose a new place to focus.” So that’s-

Renee:

Yeah.

Travis:

That’s a big one, right? The difficulty of wanting it to be perfect.

Renee:

Yeah. Yeah. And is GEARS the right place to start? If someone’s thinking about, okay, well what’s the first thing to do? Is GEARS where they should be? Is that the first thing they should go for?

Travis:

GEARS, yeah. I’d say if you’re a person who is, who likes to experiment with organizational systems, if you’re a productivity junkie like I am, then GEARS is definitely the place to start because it will be grounding in a way that feels familiar. So…

Renee:

Yeah.

Travis:

It will feel like, okay, I’m building awareness, but I’m doing something that feels like I’m organizing my day.

Renee:

Yeah.

Travis:

So it feels like it’s worthwhile. Now if that’s not you or if you want something a little extra, then one of the best things you can do each day is just build in some space to either practice some kind of mindfulness, meditation, or to just have, if you want to make it extremely simple, since we’re talking about simplifying things, just sit and have 10 breaths and just count each exhale. Go through 10 breaths, and then choose where to focus next. And you can do that when you start your day, or you can do that as often as you want. I would say if you’re hearing that and you’re like, “Oh, I’m going to do that every single hour on the hour.” Okay. That’s a little bit of overachieving. I totally hear you there. I’ve done this too. So if you’re doing that, aim for just once a day. Just do it once a day. Get that going consistently and then go from there.

Renee:

Yep. Yep. Awesome. I’m one of those people that as soon I hear someone say, “Do deep breathing,” whatever, as soon as you said that, I don’t know if you noticed, but I was like, “Oh yeah, I’m not breathing.”

Travis:

Same here. I’m going to take a deep breath here as I talk about breathing.

Renee:

We practice what we… What is it? No. We teach what we most need to learn. It’s like that.

Travis:

Yes, exactly. Well, and that’s, and this is a perfect example where it’d be easy to say, “Oh, okay. Today I haven’t breathed as well as I wanted to, so I’m a failure at that. I’m terrible at it.” Or I could say, “Okay, well this is just part of something that I’m still working on.” And I honestly-

Renee:

Yeah.

Travis:

… with breathing, I expect to work on it for my whole life. I don’t expect to ever master it or finish.

Renee:

It’s kind of an essential element to living. So yeah, probably good to continue that on.

Travis:

I hope to be able to continue working on it my whole life. Yes.

Renee:

Awesome. Awesome. All right, so if people want to know more about who you are and what they do and they’re like, “Okay, give me some of this,” where can they go?

Travis:

Yeah, so my website is mindful productive dot com.

Renee:

Great.

Travis:

And if you want to get a downloadable copy of GEARS, of what we just talked about. If you’re hearing this and you’re like, “Oh, I would like a download of that,” then mindful productive dot com slash GEARS

Renee:

Perfect. Yes, yes, yes. Love it. Love it. You know I love an acronym, don’t you? All right. Great. So, any final hot tips before we wrap it up for today? Actually, you know what? I did have one more question I wanted to ask you because there are, I know because this is me being the overachiever, is it’s like, oh, I don’t have time to do this stuff. Right? So it’s very, this is the cyclical kind of pattern to get hooked into. What sort of results or benefits can people expect? Why is this worth it?

Travis:

Oh yeah. So first of all, if you feel like you don’t have time, this is the same thing that I used to tell myself all the time. And the reason why it’s stuck, or the reason why this became my profession, my life, why I’m so committed to it, is because of what happens. So when you start incorporating this kind of mindful approach, what happens is the things that would normally derail you for an hour, a day, a month, a year, from if it goes to burnout, it can easily be a year.

Renee:

Yeah.

Travis:

Suddenly they lose their intensity and lose their power. And it gives us, it gives me the ability to consistently return to wherever I need to be. This, over time you get a massively increased awareness of your experience. Now that doesn’t necessarily mean that it always feels good or happy or enjoyable, because you just start noticing more.

 

So that’s the whole experience, which some of it is not the most exciting stuff to notice. That said, when you see stuff like, okay, I’m experiencing imposter syndrome, or I’m experiencing fear of failure, or I’m procrastinating because of X, Y, Z… It gives you the ability to then choose what to do next. And so this kind of practice over time, it doesn’t have to be every single day for the rest of your life. It can be three or four or five days a week. That would be huge. And you’ll start seeing results within, honestly, maybe the first day you do it, but within a couple of weeks you’ll start seeing some significant changes and it just builds up from there.

Renee:

Yeah. Yeah. So what sort of results have you got as a result of doing, because you’re doing this now?

Travis:

Yeah. So I’m much more able to come back after something really unpleasant happens. So for example, nobody likes getting a no from a potential client. Right? And that’s the kind of thing where, early on in business it can derail a whole day, or it can derail your whole week, but the ability to see that and say, “Okay, I see these emotions, I see this. Now I can return,” has been huge. And then I guess in terms of more tangible benefits, it’s allowed me to create so much more in my business, but not more for more’s sake. Right? It’s more of the right stuff, more of the things that matter for my business, for the way that I run my business, and for the people that I’m serving.

Renee:

Yeah. Beautiful. Thank you so, so much. It’s been great to have you on the show as my first Texan. Whoa.

Travis:

Well I guess, I don’t know if I’ve said y’all yet, so-

Renee:

Oh yeah, thank you.

Travis:

I’m really glad that y’all listened.

Renee:

Thanks for dropping that in though. We really needed that for cultural context.

Travis:

Good. You’re welcome.

Renee:

Yeah. Good tick done. We have had a y’all on Leveraged and Loving It. Been there. Done that. Tick it off my checklist. You know how I love to tick a box. Awesome. Thank you so much for being on the show, Travis. It’s been great to speak to you today. You’ve been listening to Leveraged and Loving It. I’m Renee Hasseldine, speak to you next week. Bye!

 

 


renee-b&W webRenée Hasseldine works with coaches, experts & thought leaders to turn what is in their brilliant minds into powerful signature systems using visual models. Her knack for extracting and unpacking thoughts and turning them into unique intellectual property is sheer genius.

Renée is the author of the best-selling book ‘Share Your Passion’, she is the host of the ‘Leveraged and Loving It’ podcast and a panel member on The Business Playroom TV.

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