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For those of us who have service-based businesses that rely on our expertise, it can be hard to untangle the web of information in our heads. We also know that confused customers don’t buy.

So how do we take what’s in our brains and unpack it in such a way that we can clearly and succinctly explain to potential customers the problem that we solve and how we solve it?

Lisa Westgate found that every time she spoke about her work, she never gave the same answer twice. She also had a haphazard approach to creating talks or social media posts. Now that she has a clearly defined SIgnature System using Visual Models, her life has become so much easier.

In this episode, I’m joined by a graduate of my Game Changer program, Lisa Westgate to share a little about her work and how creating her Signature System using Visual Models has transformed her business.

We discuss:

  • Post-traumatic stress disorder and her personal development journey
  • Diagnosis vs prognosis
  • Finding different pathways to assist with your mental health
  • Why self-care is caring for others
  • Diarised focus and why it matters
  • How a Signature System has given Lisa clarity and focus in her business
  • The overwhelm of not having a clear structure and framework
  • The power of Visual Models in your business
  • How to map out all your social media in an hour

More about Lisa Westgate

Founder of Freedom Mindset Training, ex Paramedic Lisa Westgate is leveraging her lived experience of overcoming PTSD to change the world one open conversation at a time. She is a Speaker, Author, Trainer and Coach.

Visit her website

 

TRANSCRIPT:

Renee:

Welcome back to Leveraged and Loving It. Renee Hasseldine here and today we are joined by Lisa Westgate, who is the founder of Freedom Mindset Training. She’s an ex-paramedic and she is leveraging her lived experience of overcoming PTSD to change the world one open conversation at a time. And she’s totally scaled it up by creating her visual model, so yay, Lisa Westgate.

Lisa:

Yay. Thanks for having me.

Renee:

All right. So tell us a little bit about your background and your story, Lisa, just to help our audience get to know you.

Lisa:

Sure. So as you said, I’m an ex-paramedic. I did that for over a decade and left that role due to mental health. So what I mean by that is, I didn’t choose to leave my job, which comes as a shock to some people that know me, like, “Oh, I thought you loved it.” I’m like, “I do.” So for me, mental health challenges, including PTSD, were really the rug that got pulled out from under me in terms of my career. That was what I was going to do until retirement age. I was locked in. All good.

Lisa:

And then in 2013, everything sort of fell into a big hole, and I got told the hole was called Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. So lots of people are aware that it’s very common in the emergency services and in military and, of course, anybody can develop PTSD. It’s not exclusive to uniformed roles or any job. And that derailed everything, really, at that time. I was given the story that a lot of people were given, which is PTSD is something you’ll have for life. You have to learn to live with it. Manage your symptoms. Maybe take some medication. See a psychologist, talk about your stuff. Now something that not many people know about me, and I don’t usually share it, might be an overshare, but-

Renee:

Never on my show.

Lisa:

I was born breech, which means I came out butt-first into the world. And my mom tells the story and says that is how I have approached everything ever since. And that’s pretty much how I responded to these diagnoses. They said, “You got PTSD…”

Renee:

You showed them your butt?

Lisa:

Well, I’ve been stubborn since the day I was born. I wasn’t [inaudible 00:02:32] to do anything the easy way. And so the stubborn Lisa went, “Oh, yeah. That’s not going to work me. I’m not really interested in talking about my stuff over and over again. I don’t really want to be on meds anymore,” which I had already been on for eight years at that point. “What else have you got? What other options do I have?” And so I call that stage, curious.

Lisa:

And I got to that point of curiosity. Mind you, I had a good wallow. I had a good three-month wallow in the couch and just getting really eased in and one with the couch, and doing the whole laid in, Netflix, PD thing. And so I tried it on, but it didn’t work for me. I was not going to stay where I was. I got put on a disability pension at 34, which, if you’re over 34 now, is kind of confronting to think about. This is it. This is your life. You get to sit here and do nothing. You’re done at 34, which, yeah. So that didn’t work for me. I started looking for other options and that curiosity led me on a path of discovery, and I spent 18 months essentially doing what I in a very cliché way call my personal development journey. I do a lot of public speaking now, and I always make sure I get the word journey in, because that’s how you know-

Renee:

That’s how you know it’s really important.

Lisa:

That’s right, because you’ve been on a journey. It’s a really cliched word, but the ways-

Renee:

It’s like you’re in a reality TV show and, “I just really love the journey.”

Lisa:

It’s all about the journey. And it’s kind of goofy, but the reason that we use that word is because that’s really what it is.

Renee:

Yep.

Lisa:

It’s really walking a path. It’s not an event. It’s not an overnight thing. It’s a process and it takes time, and so, it’s on a dorky journey. It is. That’s probably the best word we’ve got right now to explain that process. So, yeah. And so through that 18-month process of self-reflection and having the opportunity to learn certain frameworks and structures around learning about my own mindset, my own belief systems, my own capacity for learning, and just really going deep within, that really pulled me through and gave the realisation that this is my life, and regardless of what you think happens at the end of it, right now it’s the only I’ve got.

Lisa:

So I have to choose what I’m going to do with that life and what it looks like. And really, it enabled me to step into a far more empowered space and decide that I was going to choose how my life was going to be from this day on. So what happened to me happened, and I can’t change that, but I can decide from today where do I want things to head? I got to the end of that, I guess. I say end, the end of that 18-month period. The journey continues.

Renee:

Hashtag it’s all about the journey.

Lisa:

Hashtag all about the journey. I got to the end of that 18-month period and thought, “Well, now what do I do?” And I felt like I had got really amazing information and had gone through this incredible experience, and knowing, as I said, that PTSD is so rampant in emergency services and a lot of my colleagues, like police and ambulance, really challenged by these problems, and they are told the same story I was, which is you’re going to have this for the rest of your life… Your triggers, take your meds. And I thought, “Well, if that didn’t work for me, there’s a good chance that that’s not going to work for a lot of other people.”

Renee:

Yeah, maybe some other people want to have a life beyond PTSD. Go figure.

Lisa:

Yeah. Maybe-

Renee:

They want to live.

Lisa:

Maybe they’re also stubborn like I was and went, “Not really an option. What else have you got?” Yeah, so I took what I had learned, and that processes, and the framework that I learned, and all those sorts of tools, and I took them and that’s really where the genesis of my business became was, “How can I share this with other people? How can I show people that are where I was and perhaps calling themselves broken?” And, “There’s something wrong with me,” and all that stuff that I was saying when I was on the couch for three months. Take it to those people and say, “If that pathway you’re being offered over there doesn’t work for you, there’s another one.” And that’s pretty much what I’ve been doing in one way or another since about 2015, so coming up to five years of just trying to get the word out that there are other choices. There are other options.

Renee:

Yeah.

Lisa:

Your trauma doesn’t define you. Your stories don’t define you. And you can come back to yourself, become empowered, and then make some decisions from that point, rather than what the doctor says, or what the weather is, or what month it is, or anything that is external to yourself.

Renee:

Yeah.

Lisa:

Everything comes from within and if you start from that place of strength, I think, life actually gets simpler because you just decide for yourself what you want your life to be, which sounds easy.

Renee:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. So if you could go back to Lisa laying on the couch for those three months wallowing, what would you say to her?

Lisa:

I would say that I want her to know that there’s hope. That this isn’t forever, and get curious. Start asking questions. And not only is there hope, but there’s solutions. There’s structure and there’s programmes. Hope is like a really lovely, “It’s okay. There’s hope.” You’re like, “Well, great.”

Renee:

It almost sounds a bit like gambling though, doesn’t it? There’s hope, like you could win-

Lisa:

You could…

Renee:

But you also could lose.

Lisa:

Yeah, absolutely. Whereas there’s even more than hope, there’s other pathways to resolution. There’s other ways to get you to where you want to get to.

Renee:

Yeah.

Lisa:

And the first question that, really, I was asked, it really smacked me up the side of the head, was, “Well, what do you want?” And I know silence is a challenge for a podcast, but-

Renee:

Nope, it’s all good.

Lisa:

I just sort of sat there, stunned, because I’d spent so much energy over those previous couple of months thinking about what I didn’t want. I didn’t want to be sick anymore. I didn’t want to stay on the couch. I didn’t want to be unemployed. I didn’t want to be broken. I didn’t want to be useless and all the things that I thought I was at the time… Being unable to work and not contributing to my household income, and not being the parent I wanted to be at the time. And I was so focused on what I didn’t want and how I didn’t want to be living, that I really had not put in any time or energy into, “Well, what do I want? What does the life I want to lead look like?”

Renee:

Yeah.

Lisa:

So I would probably ask Lisa on the couch, “What do you want? Where do you want to be in a year? Two years? Five years? Because if you don’t want to be on the couch, then you better get your ass up and start moving and do something else. Because if you stay on the couch, you’re still going to be on the couch in a couple of years.”

Renee:

Yep. Yeah, great. Yeah, and I wonder also, would you also say that that diagnosis that you were given is not the only option?

Lisa:

Deepak Chopra has this beautiful quote. I always find solace in Deepak. He’s got so many year of wisdom. And I heard this quote from him and it so resonated because it was exactly where I was at the time when I heard it. And what he said was, “You can accept the diagnosis, but don’t accept the prognosis.” And of course, as a medical doctor, he understands the difference. So for anyone that doesn’t understand the difference, the diagnosis is kind of what box you fit in right now according to medicine. So at the time, I fit in a box called PTSD. The prognosis is the medical extrapolation of that. So for example, they might say, “Your leg’s broken.” That’s your diagnosis. You’ve got a broken leg.

Lisa:

Your prognosis is, “We’re going to do some surgery, then it’s going to take you six months of rehab to be able to walk on your leg again.” Right? That’s the prognosis, which is what we see in your future. So what he’s saying in that quote is, “Yeah, okay, your leg’s broken, but it’s up to you how long that rehab takes.” So they’re telling you, based on their experience, sure, this can take six months… But what’s to say you can’t do it in half the time? What’s to say it doesn’t take you three months? So my diagnosis, “Yep, that’s the box they put me in.” I couldn’t argue with that at the time, but what I questioned was the prognosis, which was-

Renee:

Yep.

Lisa:

PTSD, and the media will tell you, PTSD ends marriages. PTSD ends lives. People commit suicide. If you’re listening in the United States, the common narrative is that PTSD leads to people committing shooting crimes. So they like to link soldiers with PTSD that, inverted commas, go postal and commit some sort of horrible act, which a lot of the time is actually a domestic violence or family violence issue. But PTSD gets linked to a lot of these negative things, so marriage break-downs, suicide, and even crimes. I didn’t accept that, and I would encourage anybody that has been given that diagnosis to get curious and investigate and ask questions about the prognosis.

Renee:

Yep. Yep.

Lisa:

Yeah.

Renee:

Awesome.

Lisa:                          Yeah.

Renee:                     I love that because you’ve totally flipped it. I mean, you did not accept the prognosis, you just went, “Forget it. I’m finding my own solution,” and you’re living proof that there is life beyond PTSD, right?

Lisa:                          Absolutely. And I’m not unique. There’s actually a lot of people, and most people I know that have been down some sort of alternative healing pathway, have come back to the community. So whether they’re ex-police and they’ve come back to the police community and said, “You can get better. There’s something I can help you with,” so I know of people all over Australia and beyond that have moved past that diagnosis and changed their prognosis.

Renee:                     Yeah.

Lisa:                          And created the life they wanted beyond that diagnosis. And now, in the majority, telling their story. Telling their truth and sharing that knowledge, that this is a possibility with their previous tribe.

Renee:                     Yep.

Lisa:                          Military or police or ambulance.

Renee:                     Yep. Yeah. And that’s the thing, is once you were able to get beyond yourself, you now work with others, right? So tell us a little bit about who you’re working with now and how you help them.

Lisa:                          Yeah. Look, at the heart of, I think, most people who join up for some of those services… I mean it’s called a service. They’re called the services whether its military services or emergency services, we’re service driven people. I don’t know anybody that goes into a uniformed role because the money’s great, you know? It’s not what we do, it’s not our focus. Our focus is making the community a better place, helping the people around us. And so even having gone through these difficult period in our lives, we often return to want to be of service and help.

Lisa:                          So in my case, I’m actually doing a lot of work with the police at the moment, Victoria Police. I volunteer at the police academy every second Thursday and I speak to recruits. And the beauty of speaking to recruits about their mental health is they are two weeks into their training. These amazing men and women were civilians two weeks ago. So I get this incredible opportunity to speak to them about systems, and structures, and some things they can put in place now, very early in their career, so that they have a long, mentally healthy, career and they are less likely, in my opinion, with the right tools, to fall into a hole like I did and perhaps not stay as long… So maybe not as deep and maybe not as long.

Renee:                     Yep.

Lisa:

We can’t stop anybody from having challenges in their life. We all need challenges to grow. That’s how we grow as human beings, is we get challenged and we realise, “Wow, I can get through that. I can overcome that. That’s cool.” So they will have bad days, like we all have bad days or weeks or months, but if I can give them some systems and some structure now, early, hopefully, then I feel that that’s going to set them up for a more successful career and be able to look after themselves. My new hashtag aside from it’s all about the journey, is-

Renee:

Is that real or are we just joking about that one?

Lisa:

Well, I don’t know. Maybe after today, it’s real. No, my new hashtag is self-care is caring for others, because I think it’s a really big thing and certainly not exclusive to those roles, excuse me, to put ourselves last, to look after everybody else. We do it as moms. We do it as business owners. We look after our employees. We make sure everybody else is looked after. And then with our spare time… Yeah, no. I don’t remember ever having any of that. Have you had any? Have you had spare time in the last, I don’t know?

Renee:

Well, I have now blocked it into my weekly schedule that Tuesdays, moving forward from next year because I already have podcasts scheduled for this year, but for next year, my Tuesdays are to create and can play. I have play into my week schedule.

Lisa:

Excellent. Diarist focus we call that.

Renee:

Yeah. Yeah.

Lisa:

Diarist focus. I love it. So even, not to pick on you, but even Renee Hasseldine of Leveraged and Loving It, has been challenged by this idea of spare time. And a lot of that is about prioritising yourself.

Renee:

Yeah.

Lisa:

Not you, specifically, the collective you. Even if we literally have the hours in the day, actually making time for ourselves is a really… Seems like a really big deal.

Renee:

See, I feel like it seems to come in waves. They’ll be times when I’m really good at focusing on it and I remember it, and I’ll schedule my massages, and I’ll go sit in cafes, and I’ll go for walks, and I’ll do all those things that I know fills me up. And then they’ll be times where I just get busy getting busy.

Lisa:

Yeah, absolutely. I hear getting busy a lot, which is really funny because, like I say, I’m at the academy and I have these recruits. And they’re like, “Oh, yeah. No, I’m really good and I play basketball, and I do this and I do that. Oh, except for the last couple of weeks because it’s been really hectic.” And I’m like, “Do you imagine your life is going to get less hectic when you leave here?” And it’s the first thing that drops off when we get busy. And I think that’s so beautiful what you’ve said, is that you’ve put it in the diary, and that’s how things happen, is you block it in and you make your commitment… Like a date with yourself and you go, “Cool. I’m going to go for a walk. I’m going to go to the gym,” or whatever it is, that’s how it happens. And understanding that self-care is caring for others because your family deserves you at your best.

Renee:

Yeah.

Lisa:

Your employees deserve you at your best. Your clients deserve you at your best. And shock, horror, you deserve to be at your best, as we all do. Crazy talk, right?

Renee:

Oh, isn’t it funny how I’ll definitely prioritise it when it’s for other people, but for me, it’s… No. It’s not as important.

Lisa:

Yeah, look, and it’s not just time. We do the same thing with money. Like, “Well, there’ll be someone else in the family that needs something that’s 70% need or I could do something nice for myself. I’ll get the kids new shoes.” There’s always something. So, yeah, I think just educating around that, I’m really passionate about. So I’m doing a lot of speaking, as I said, so I’ve got these incredible opportunities with the Victoria Police to go and speak to them in all sorts of departments about… Obviously give them a little context about my challenges, my journey.

Renee:

Yes.

Lisa:

The journey. And then we talk about early warning signs, so things to look out for in terms of your mental health, particularly things to look out for in your colleagues and your friends. I know in my case, I was the last one to my own party. I came out of the PTSD closet and everyone around me went, “Yeah, we know.” I said, “I think I might have a problem.” And they went, “Yep. Yeah. You’ve been horrible to live with. Yep.” So I had no insight into my own state, really. So I think it’s really important to look out for the people around you and look out for their mental health, and so we talk about early warning signs and things to look out for, and behavioural changes. So you can have those conversations.

Renee:

Yep. Awesome. I love it.

Lisa:

Yeah.

Renee:

And I know you’re also doing work because we have worked together on creating your vision model. So tell us about life before the model… So what were you struggling with before we created those models? And how are things different now?

Lisa:

Everything. So life before the models, it was like there was a bowl of spaghetti in my head, Renee. You know this. It was like a tangled ball of wool, that’s what I had in my head. Well-intentioned wool. It was knotted up and I didn’t know where one strand followed from one to the other, and it was just a big jumbled mess of, “I think this, and I think I want to do that, and I’m really excited about that,” and the result of my jumble was nothing was happening.

Lisa:

And every time somebody would ask me, “What do you do?” I don’t think I gave the same answer twice. I would make things up on the fly. My Facebook lives, everything was really patchy and sporadic, and very sort of shotgun approach. Like, “Oh, I’ll just do a bit of this and I’ll do a bit of that. And I feel like talking about this today, so I’ll talk about that.” And as we know, we need to make it easy for people to understand what we do, what the problem we solve is, who we’re talking to, and I was all over the shop before doing my models. It was very haphazard.

Renee:

Yep. And what about now? Tell us about life after the models. What changed?

Lisa:

Life after the models. Life after the models… We got in there and we untangled the nightmare of mess that was in my head. It took couple of goes, but we finally figured it out. The model’s really a good way to systemize what was going on in my head, and I think as somebody who is, in the world of Amelia Peabody, AD, so I do like my systems and my structures, and my frameworks, and sequential order of things.

Renee:

We need to understand how it works.

Lisa:                          T

hat’s right. And I think…

Renee:

ADs unite.

Lisa:

AD, that’s right.

Renee:

That’s auditory digital for those who don’t know NLP.

Lisa:

But why? But why? Yes, it’s exactly how I’m going to do that. And then what happens next? Yeah, so we need to understand and it needs to make sense. And I think the jumble, the ball of wool, was also really emotionally leading to a lot of overwhelm because I was spending so much time trying to manage it all. The models gave me that structure and that framework to slot everything in where it goes. And so for those of you considering doing your models, once you work out what goes in which model, because I know lots of people, “Oh, I think that goes in this model,” and they’re like, “No, that excite model language and this is…” You know? So I did the online programme.

Renee:

Yeah. The Game Changer Program.

Lisa:

I did the Game Changer Program, which was amazing.

Renee:

And Lisa was the guinea pig.

Lisa:

We were like…

Renee:

Heaps of people have done it now since you.

Lisa:

Oh, good. That’s cool.

Renee:                     A

nd we’re now doing it one on one, as well. So just exactly how you got it, is exactly how it’s run now.

Lisa:

That’s excellent. So I think between the online models being structured in the way that they are plus the support that I got in terms of both over social media, so Facebook group, and also in the follow ups and conversations that we had and stuff… It just really helped to unravel it all and then put it back together in a sensible order.

Renee:

Yep.

Lisa:

And since then, everything in my brain to do with my business goes through the models.

Renee:

Yes. This is music to my ears. Like, “Yes.”

Lisa:

Yeah, look, I think I underestimated what I was going to get from it. I was, “Oh, these are cool. I like them and you get to be creative and pick your colours and your shapes,” and I liked that aspect of it as well. And I was like, “These are really great. I’ll put them on the website somewhere or I’ll use them in a PowerPoint,” but I really didn’t understand. So it’s been a few months now since that I’ve been sort of living with them in my head. I didn’t really understand in how many ways it was going to impact my business and how many ways it was going to shift the way that I think about what I’m doing and why I’m doing it. And so if I’m ever thinking about a new programme or a new communication method… I’ve been looking at, just between you and me and the podcast audience, looking at maybe doing a radio show next year.

Renee:

Yeah. Oh, that’s exciting. Exclusive, you heard it first here.

Lisa:

Don’t tell anyone. Yeah, and so when I was looking at that option of another way to communicate with people and educate around the stuff that I talk about, I looked at my models and was like, “Where will that fit in and how can I use the models within that platform, but also use the platform in the models?”

Renee:

Yeah.

Lisa:

And that’s pretty much how I decide whether I’m going to do something or not, is I go back to them and I go, “Where’s that going to fit? Or how can I use these in that?”

Renee:

Yep. Straight to the top of the class for Lisa Westgate, everyone, because that is exactly right.

Lisa:

Yeah, me.

Renee:

The model’s not just something you create and they sit on a shelf like an operating manual that you printed once or a business plan you made for the bank manager and never used again, right? The models are a living, breathing core of your business. Everything you do goes through those models. Yep.

Lisa:

Yeah. Yeah, that’s exactly [inaudible 00:28:54].

Renee:

And I’m so thrilled that you got that because, yes. If you think it’s just a thing that you use for one application, you’ve just missed the point of them entirely. Yeah.

Lisa:

Yeah. And even still, I don’t feel that I’ve, I don’t know, use them for their full potential yet.

Renee:

Well, that’s only been a few months when…

Lisa:

Yeah. I keep just-

Renee:

Books to write, courses to-

Lisa:

Books to write, that’s right. Yeah, radio shows to structure. So there’s always different avenues, different ways to implement them. And it’s so much simpler to have… They’re on my wall. I keep looking over there because they’re on my wall. I could probably… They’re like… I don’t know if you can see. There’s my new planner and there’s my models on the wall.

Renee:

Awesome.

Lisa:

So that’s why I keep looking over there. Yeah, just because they’re right there, I think all of mine, almost all of mine, are four or five words, that just summates what that aspect is… That’s a whole lot less overwhelming than trying to remember all the junk that was in there before I had them. It was all ideas and just random, and it’s… Yeah, look, as I said, I don’t think I’ve used them to their full potential. I’ve been distracted like everybody else. Had a miserable winter, we’re not much good with them. I think I pretty much hibernated for winter. And there is a resource that we also get through your programme, which is the social media mapping Excel spreadsheet magic.

Renee:

Yep.

Lisa:

I’m turning 40 in less than two month’s time and I will never, ever understand Excel spreadsheets, right? I hate Excel so much, but that-

Renee:

You’re not a real auditory digital… You failed as an AD.

Lisa:

No, it’s the kinesthetic in me that goes, “I don’t like it.” It hurts my head. I think I never got it at school so it just never made sense, and then 30 years passed. Having said that, I love that spreadsheet.

Renee:

Yes. Spreadsheets are sexy.

Lisa:

I need to ramp up my AD game. Yeah, as soon as I opened it up, and it explains… For those who haven’t seen it, it explains for each model, here’s your social media posts for number one, and there’s three points for each, and number two, three points… And it just blew my mind to see how simple all of this can be. I’m a little, I think it’s a Patriot’s Day hangover, I’m a little easily overwhelmed. It doesn’t take much for me to go, “It’s too much.”

Renee:

Yeah.

Lisa:

It’s one of my residual issues. And the idea of consistent social media posting and having to sit down and do that regularly to make sure that you’re present in people’s minds and all that sort of stuff, was something that was just… Gave me a headache and I hid under the doona thinking about it beforehand. I was just like, “It’s too much. I changed my mind. I’m just going to get a job.” And I’d hide under my doona, afraid of social media consistency. Surely I’m not the only one, right?

Renee:

You’re really not.

Lisa:

Somebody tell me, right? Wherever this is posted, send a comment. Just let me know that I’m not the only one that freaks out thinking about that. And that spreadsheet alone, we’re talking about one resource within the whole programme, that one resource, once I had my models, it just, “Oh, yeah, that makes sense. Of course, I would just do one about that aspect and one about this aspect, and no problem. It’s cool as…” What I need to do is commit the time to sit down and fill it in and do all the… create the content, which is a whole separate month of my life, I think, but-

Renee:

No, no. Because you got that structure, and you’ve got your models, you only need to spend about an hour to map it all out.

Lisa:

Yeah.

Renee:

And then batch chunk. Yeah.

Lisa:

Definitely. Yes. Yes. Yes. That’s it. It’s batching videos and getting transcripts and blogging.

Renee:

13 videos in one hour. That’s an order. That’s how you do it.

Lisa:

Is that a record? Or like?

Renee:

No. Think about it. Content marketing, right, you only need to have a three minute video for your social media, okay?

Lisa:

That’s true.

Renee:

And you know this content inside out and back to front, so don’t pretend like you need to rehearse this crap. You’ve rehearsed it a billion times, right? So all you need to do, once you’ve mapped it out, is go, “Okay, these are the 13 I’m going to record today.” You get into Zoom, you hit record, “Hi, I’m Lisa Westgate. Today I’m going to talk to you about bleh, bleh, bleh.” Do your video, hit stop. Record again. “Hi, I’m Lisa Westgate. Today I’m going to talk to you about duh, duh, duh.” Three minutes times 13 weeks equals 39 minutes. Add some time for you to have a drink of water and [inaudible 00:34:32] in between, and allow yourself an hour to record 13 videos. You are done. Do not over complicate this.

Lisa:                          Okay.

Renee:

This is to all of my clients who are listening, I am telling you, you can get a quarter’s worth of content done in one hour. Do not over complicate it. Then, give it to your VA to get it transcribed and repurposed, are you are finished. Four hours a year of recording content. Stop freaking yourself out. You do not need a month.

Lisa:

I don’t need a month. That’s good. I don’t have a month. Good.

Renee:

Who does? And Lisa, that was for everybody else, not you.

Lisa:

I was going to say, that’s, yeah. So it’s a group call out.

Renee:

Yeah.

Lisa:

Yeah, but it’s true. It’s really true. And once you have the structure around it, it feels to me like colouring in.

Renee:

Yeah.

Lisa:

What the models and resources like that do, is really give us the black and white frame, and then it’s colour by numbers.

Renee:

Yeah.

Lisa:

And you just go in and, “What are we talking about now? Cool, let’s do that.” You could even colour it in. Literally, get a highlighter, print off an Excel spreadsheet, and highlight what you’ve done. Tick, that one’s done. Yep, cool, all right. That’s okay. I’ve just worked out exactly what I’m doing tomorrow. So that’s great.

Renee:

Fantastic. Yes. Yes, yes, yes, yes.

Lisa:

Yes. I don’t know how it hit me. What am I going to do tomorrow? Ta-da.

Renee:

Brilliant.

Lisa:

So I’m using these models in ways that I never thought that I would use them. They also help me structure when I present, so as I said, doing some speaking stuff at the moment, doing a few podcasty things, and a few video interviews, as well as live speaking roles. What do you call?

Renee:

Speaking gigs?

Lisa:

Gigs? Yeah. And they help me structure my talks. So if I know that I have maybe half an hour to talk or whatever, and I work out the sequence of what I’m going to talk about at what point, and then I get to talk about what I do now. So obviously I tell the story at the start and then I give them some resources in the middle, and then I talk about what I do now and how I have leveraged those experiences to make that positive impact in the world and how I do that.

Lisa:

And really, what I talk about mostly is transformation, which is step three in my excite model. And so I just take people, really, take the audience, through that excite model, which for me starts out with if you’ve self-identified as broken at any point, you’re curious about how to not be broken, and you’re looking for some answers, then really what I offer is transformation. And that comes in either listening to me speak like they are on that day or reading the e-book that I recently published, or doing a programme with me or doing a training, and then from there, they can then go and return to be of service. And after service comes having a big impact if you want. So honestly, that’s my excite model in five words.

Renee:

Yeah.

Lisa:

Whereas I used to… I don’t know if you could ever imagine this, used to ramble. Yes.

Renee:

No. You wouldn’t. None of us listening have ever rambled and almost been a fly on the wall looking at ourselves kind of getting tangled up in our own words just going, “Shut up already. Stop it. You’re going in circles. Please make it stop.”

Lisa:

I’m so glad you said that because that really happens. It’s like an out-of-body experience. And you can hear words coming out your mouth, and you’re like, “You already said that. Just stop talking. You need to bookend this part of your talk and then you need to move on to the next,” but words are still coming out of your mouth. And all that internal dialogue is happening at the same time. So that happens a lot less now that I have a clear direction. I have a clear structure. I know what I’m talking about. Like you said, for anybody that’s gone through this process, we live and breathe our content. This is what we’re passionate about. This is what we want to talk about all the time. So I think that’s what leads to the rambling sometimes, is because we’re like, “I’m going to tell you all the things.”

Renee:

All the things because it’s so exciting and I love it so much.

Lisa:

I want to tell you all the things, that’s right. Yeah. They’re like, “You’ve got an hour.” And I’m like, “That’s not going to be enough.” You know what? It’s enough for the audience And that’s really what it’s about.

Renee:

So actually that’s my next question is, speaking about the audience, now that you have your models, what are you noticing is different in the way you’re being received by audiences and people that you’re speaking to about what you do? What’s changed there? Because as business owners, it’s changed me because as people who want to make a difference, it all comes back to what is the impact I’m having? How am I helping people? So how has that transformed?

Lisa:

I think because I’m coming across as much more organised in my thoughts, much more consistent in my messaging, people can focus on the actual content of what I’m saying. And the feedback I’m getting is they’re actually receiving the value I want to impart rather than getting caught up in how quickly I was talking or any sort of random diversions I went on. The feedback I’ve got from the last couple of presentations has been that everybody could take something away from it, that they were actually hearing my message because I’m so much clearer now about what that message is.

Renee:

Yes. Boom. That’s it. You’re making a difference.

Lisa:

Hope so.

Renee:

You know you are. You know you are.

Lisa:

That’s the plan, right? That what we’re all in it for, you know?

Renee:

Yeah, totally.

Lisa:

Like I said, I love that entrepreneur meme that says, “Running your own business is great, you get to choose which six to eight hours a day you get to work.”

Renee:

Unless you’re Leveraged and Loving It, in which case-

Lisa:

Unless you’re Leveraged and Loving It, and do your models, and then you can cut it down.

Renee:

Yeah. Focus, people, focus.

Lisa:

We’re all passionate. We’re all here because we want to make a difference. And if you’re finding yourself trying to untangle the ball of wool in your head on the fly, that’s when you’re going to ramble. That’s when you’re going to be repeating yourself. That’s when you’re going to be like, “Oh, hang on. I already told you that bit. What was the next bit?” And going through this process and having your models just settles all of that and it provides that sequence and structure because, ultimately, you don’t want to be wasting time. You want to make the most of whatever time you have in front of your potential audience, whoever that is.

Lisa:

I know there’s networking events where they’re like, “You’ve got 40 seconds to talk about what you do.” And if you have a ball of wool in your brain, and you go, “… Things and helping, and good stuff and.” And they’re like, “Bing. Time’s up.” And you’re like, “Oh, that did not get across at all. What I want to do and how I help people.” So the simpler and more structured and clearer in your own mind you can be, and for me that comes from doing the models, so when people say, “What do you do? You’ve got 40 seconds.” And I can say, “I take broken people who, or people who self-identified as broken, and they’re now curious and they’re looking for transformation, and I give them a framework for that transformation.” People are like, “Oh, that sounds really interesting. Tell me more.” And that opens up a conversation.

Renee:

Yeah.

Lisa:

That’s a whole lot clearer than me like, “Oh, well, I used to be an ambo,” and I’d sort of give them a history lesson when really they just want to know whether they want to have more of a conversation. That’s all people really want to know at that point, so.

Renee:

Love it, love it. So speaking of continuing the conversation, if people want to find out more about who you are and what you do, where can they go?

Lisa:

So the best thing to do at this point is to hope onto my Facebook business page, which is just LisaWestgate-fmt, which stands for Freedom Mindset Training.

Renee:

Great.

Lisa:

And website’s under construction again.

Renee:

Oh, I’m sure nobody in the audience has ever been in that situation before.

Lisa:

Oh, no. We haven’t rebranded three, four times in the last few years.

Renee:

Okay.

Lisa:

And look, the purpose of doing that, again, is to simplify and streamline things just to make it easier for people to really get the messaging. So I’m outsourcing it this time.

Renee:

Go, you.

Lisa:

Rather than jumbling it myself, thankfully.

Renee:

Brilliant. Awesome.

Lisa:

Thank you.

Renee:

Thank you. Thank you so, so much. And if people are still sitting on the fence about doing Game Changer or working with me with Authority Accelerator, what do you say?

Lisa:

I’m confused as to why, after all of this-

Renee:

I was wondering what that face meant. I was like-

Lisa:

You’d be sitting on the fence. Do you want to stay confused? You want to have really unclear messaging? Do you want to spend your time overwhelmed and stressing about all the three million things that you think you need to do, when actually you need to do 12. Yeah. Why would you not do it? Renee’s gift is taking the complex and simplifying it a lot like mine is getting the goal out of your head and putting it into this structure… And it’s not… I mean it is because she geeks out over it, but it’s also because it’s better for us, her client. It’s better for us to run our business, to make the difference that we want to make in the world, if we have this. So, yeah, that’s confusing. I don’t know why anyone would not want to do that. You know what? If you’re holding back and you’ve got some sort of fear of success, find me on Facebook, we’ll knock that on the head and I’ll hook you up with Renee.

Renee:

I love that, but the reality is, you say you’re confused, but you waited a long time. You stalked me for a long time before we started working together. So you know what that’s like, you know why people delay.

Lisa:

I did stalk you for a long time. It’s true. Yeah, it was really curly hair envy for the beginning of it and then I started listening to what you’re talking about. Yeah, look, I did delay. It’s true. It’s confession time.

Renee:

Confession time.

Lisa:

And the reason that I picked fear of success is, I think, because that was a strong part of why I delayed… Was because I was afraid. I say was like I’m over it. Afraid of stepping into my own life. Afraid of stepping in and letting what I have shine. And again, it’s a process, you know? It’s a journey.

Renee:

It’s a journey.

Lisa:

It’s a stage. It’s a journey.

Renee:

Hashtag it’s a journey.

Lisa:

Hashtag it’s a journey. And that for me is the next stage because there’s a lot of people… I may have overcome what I’ve overcome and that’s all great. There’s a lot of people that are calling me nasty things or make suggestions about how sick I was… If I got over PTSD, maybe I didn’t have PTSD in the first place.

Renee:

Oh.

Lisa:

All sorts of really awful… And so there is a vulnerability in stepping out and speaking your truth. Whatever that is.

Renee:

Yeah.

Lisa:

And so the delay was a lot in part to do with that, but doing the models has really… Doing the Game Changer Programme has also helped with that. It’s helped me be clearer in response to those people as well. And pretty much just brushing them aside an moving forward because they’re not my people.

Renee:

They’re totally not your people. And you own your authority now. You own your own methodology that you have created. No one else has it. It is yours.

Lisa:

It is mine.

Renee:

Your own intellectual property.

Lisa:

It’s on the wall.

Renee:

On the wall. No one can deny it. It is on the wall.

Lisa:

It’s on the wall. If it’s on the wall, it’s legit. It’s going to be in a book. It’s going to be everywhere.

Renee:

Too funny. Awesome. Thank you so, so much, Lisa. It’s been so much fun chatting with you. I’m sure we could talk forever and ever, but we must wrap it up. So thank you so much for being on the show. I really appreciate your time today and for anyone else out there who has experienced trauma and feels like they’ve been given a prognosis that they do not want to accept, please do look Lisa up. Go and check it out. And also go and check out her fantastic trainings. She really does have so much for you to offer, for you to be able to take what you’re doing and share it with the world. So mwah. Thank you, Lisa.

Lisa:

Thank you so much, darling. Yes, lots of Lisa Westgate to come in 2020.

Renee:

Yeah, baby. I’m Renee Hasseldine and you’re listening to Leveraged and Loving It. Talk to you next week.

 

 


renee-b&W webRenée Hasseldine works with coaches, experts & thought leaders to turn what is in their brilliant minds into powerful signature systems using visual models. Her knack for extracting and unpacking thoughts and turning them into unique intellectual property is sheer genius.

Renée is the author of the best-selling book ‘Share Your Passion’, she is the host of the ‘Leveraged and Loving It’ podcast and a panel member on The Business Playroom TV.

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