Listen on Apple Podcasts | Listen on Spotify | Listen on Google Podcasts

How do you scale your business for ultimate success? What is the secret behind getting over one million podcast downloads in six months? I’m joined by Barry Magliarditi, founder of The Game Changers and host of The Comeback Game.

In this episode, we discuss:

  • Why he founded his podcast ‘The Comeback Game’
  • The power of the hero’s journey
  • His podcast content marketing strategy
  • How he generates 1000 leads a month
  • What The Game Changers funnel looks like
  • Keys to success for hiring VAs
  • What to look for when outsourcing
  • Mistakes business owners make when growing their team
  • The importance of measuring KPIs
  • Shifting your identity from working in your business to working on your business
  • Why running a business is like parenting
  • and more

    More about Barry Magliarditi

    Barry Magliarditi is the founder and director of The Game Changers. Barry has been recognised for his thought leadership by the 30 under 30, Multiple Telstra Business awards and was selected as the winner of the 2016 Invia business coach of the year. His training programs are used by 100s of companies around the world and he continues to push the boundaries helping them to triple their profits and double their time off in 12-months or less. Last year Barry launched a Podcast called The Comeback Game, which shares the trials and tribulations of some of the most successful entrepreneurs in the world on their journey to success and has reached over 1,000,000 business owners since launching mid last year.

    The Game Changers

     

    TRANSCRIPT:

     

    Renee:

    Hey, Renee Hasseldine here on Leveraged and Loving It. On today’s episode, we are joined by Barry Magliarditi. I feel like I just won a prize.

    Barry:

    You should.

    Renee:

    Yep. Awesome. Thank you so much for being on the show, great to speak with you and we’re going to talk about scaling.

    Barry:

    Let’s do it.

    Renee:

    Let’s do it. Let’s do it. But first, but first but first. You launched your podcast last year, The Comeback Game.

    Barry:

    We did.

    Renee:

    How many people have you reached already on that podcast?

    Barry:

    Over a million in the first month.

    Renee:

    Okay, so my podcast is almost three years old, so I need to say how the actual fuck did you do that?

    Barry:

    Scaling.

    Renee:

    Tell me. Tell me, what is the actual… All in one word, how they actual…

    Barry:

    We don’t fully know, we’ve got some ideas. Part of it is guests so I came up with this bit of an idea that I was like, okay, if we want to get out and reach, so the premise behind it was how do we reach a tonne of people that we can’t through the Game Changers programme and how do we kind of bust this misconception that if you pay a coach enough money, you won’t have problems anymore because it’s just bullshit. Like the bigger you grow, the bigger the business grows, the more problems you have you just become a different version of yourself that can handle those problems and so I was like, “Well, what if I found the most influential person I know who’s awesome and interview them, showed them a good time and then have them share with me their friends in their network to interview.” and that was kind of how it started and we’ve managed to have some absolutely incredible guests on the show.

    Yesterday, we had the founder of Giftology, phenomenal guy in the States, you know, he gets paid 60 grand an hour to keynote speak, just spoke at a Ryan [Dyson 00:02:13] event, the War Room over in the States and we’ve just leveraged one after the other essentially by being authentic, having a fantastic interview with them, and then asking them, “Hey, who else do you know would love to get on the podcast?” And I think that business leaders and entrepreneurs are starting to realise that podcasting is still very much in its infant years.

    I think this time last year I was just speaking to a guy, Steve Olsher, who’s launching podcastmagazine.com in January so he’s giving lifetime memberships away at the moment, been podcasting since it began and he was sharing that 12 months ago there was 500,000 podcast shows. Now as of this year, 12 months later, there’s 750,000 shows.

    Renee:

    Whoa.

    Barry:

    If you look at that in comparison to websites though, there’s billions of websites, right? So we’re still very much in the infancy years of podcasting and it’s so easy to interact with people’s podcasts. The average person that listens to podcasts consumed seven episodes a week. As of 12 months ago, it was five episodes a week. So there’s a radical growth cycle in podcasting and I think that for us that growth, most of it was organic through leveraging our guests. You know, we had some amazing people too. Like JPC has a social following of like two plus million people. Peng Joon the same, two plus million people like Dave Woodward, the CEO of ClickFunnels, like a bunch of phenomenal guests but the coolest thing though really is that the feedback we’ve had of how much the episodes have change people’s lives because we debug these challenges that these people go through and who they’ve become as a result of it.

    Renee:

    Yes. Yeah, because I mean the podcast is called the Comeback Game so what does that actually mean to you? Why did you go with that theme?

    Barry:

    Well really it was actually a name that my partner came up with and because we wanted to share the comeback story of these people and it was kind of based on the hero’s journey. You look at the movies, movies are based on the hero’s journey, which is what’s so enticing.

    Renee:

    And so is your Excite Models people.

    Barry:

    Yeah and draws us in and so we wanted to kind of understand like what are the challenges and adversities that these people have faced during their growth of their business and the success that they’ve had and who they become through that and everyone has a comeback game story like everyone’s got to come back story. I’m sure you do self, like everyone has those adversities and the funny thing is Renee, is that we typically don’t remember those days. We were like, “This is the best day of my life.”

    Barry:

    I know I’ve said that, but I can’t ever remember what was happening when I said it. I can remember those dark days. I can remember those days that I was down and out on my knees, like bawling my eyes out, having no freaking idea what life had in store for me next and yet there had been the most impactful years of my life and it really shaped who I’ve become today. It’s through those pressures and challenges that we actually find out who we really are and what we’re really here to do.

    Renee:

    Yeah, yeah, totally. I mean, yeah, for me, I’ve had several of those on my knees moments, one being back in the corporate world when I hit rock bottom and was depressed and then through 19 years of business, I mean, how many times do you end up thinking, “What the hell have I done?”

    Barry:

    Yeah.

    Renee:

    Yep. Yeah. Cool. Awesome. So I love that and by the sounds of it, mostly it’s because you’re leveraging the audiences of the guests that you’re having on the show but what sort of marketing stuff are you doing at your end as well to promote the episodes?

    Barry:

    So part of our content strategy, so we produce about a thousand leads a month, thereabouts through other lead generation campaigns and we typically send two content emails a week, Tuesdays and Thursdays to our audiences, like just value packed content around how to grow and scale your business and then on Sundays we always release our podcast episodes. So all of our database, which is like, I don’t know how many people we’ve got in there now, get an episode every Sunday.

    Barry:

    We do a bunch of stuff on Instagram as well and we were running some paid traffic via Facebook for awhile where we actually posted the whole episode on Facebook, the full episode and then paid traffic to it mainly to get people kind of familiar and that was the first episode but it made people familiar with who we are, what we’re about and we’ve noticed that obviously those people come back and come back and come back and then share it.

    Barry:

    Outside of that, we’ve just published it I think when like 22 or 25 different platforms. We were one of the first podcasts on Spotify. So we like our…

    Renee:

    I beat you to it just. Not that I’m competitive or anything but I was there first.

    Barry:

    Wondering if we can get on Spotify and it wasn’t an easy process at the time but we’re on Spotify now. Most people are posting now on Spotify so different things like that but I think ultimately it comes down to what is it you sharing. What’s the reason for these guests or viewers to come back? How are you enticing them or inviting them to invite others into and around that campfire and the guests’ are a huge one as well. If you have a great interview with someone that’s willing to, like typically whenever I’m interviewed on a show like yourself, I’ll go and push your episode out as one of our episodes.

    Barry:

    So I’ll go include your episode because it saves us a weekly episode from needing to be recorded but it’s also that that giving back as well, which I think is good karma.

    Renee:

    Yeah, nice, nice, nice, nice. So hold on, I’m going to go back to something you said a few sentences ago. You said something about that you generate a thousand leads a month, is that right?

    Barry:

    Yeah.

    Renee:

    I got that right?

    Barry:

    Yeah.

    Renee:

    Ish? Okay because I know my audience wants to know exactly how do you do that?

    Barry:

    I was actually, it’s funny, I had one more good friends Paul Dunn in Melbourne last night. So Paul Dunn runs a phenomenal business called B1G1.

    Renee:

    Yep.

    Barry:

    If you’ve never checked them out, checking them out, incredible. And we took him out for dinner last night at the Veggie Bar here in Melbourne.

    Renee:

    Ah yes! Melbourne institution.

    Barry:

    And he was quizzing me on the business and he’s like, “What you guys are doing is extraordinary.” And I was like, “Really?” Like it’s what we’ve kind of always done and I’ve learned to done it and I guess I’ve just done over and over and over again and I remember many, many years ago, we tried to hire a bunch of marketing companies and everyone we hired, we found that they’re any good at marketing themselves and when it would come to marketing for clients they just couldn’t produce the goods. And I remember Jess said to me, my partner said to me, “Hey, we should just be doing this ourselves.” And are resisted and resisted, resistant because I’m like Facebook algorithms, like ads. Like I just want to coach people on breaking through with their inner game like I don’t want to get into this any techie stuff and eventually she wore me down. It took her about two years, but she wore me down and we hired a guy.

    Renee:

    Lucky for you.

    Barry:

    Yeah, we hired this guy and paid him 25 grand to learn how to run Facebook ads and he spent an hour with us and gave us eight hours of content videos. Now some of your viewers or listeners that they might be going like, “That’s a lot of money.” But if you look at these things here, each of these is worth $1 million each and there’s at least another one on its way at the moment. Now there are two Comma Club awards that are given to people that have got one funnel that generates more than a million dollars in revenue in one year and we’ve ourselves through our marketing team have generated every single one of those from that $25,000 spent a few years ago.

    Renee:

    Wow.

    Barry:

    We invested that money. We spend all day Friday watching these videos, eight hours. We spent all day Saturday and Sunday putting together our first campaign. We launched it Sunday night at about 11:00 PM I think it was, went to bed, woke up, went and turned my phone on and we had our first lead at 8:00 AM on a Monday morning.

    By Wednesday that week we’d made in our first hour $25,000 into one of our programmes over the phone and that was the start of something massive because it wasn’t just the fact that we like, there was no better feeling than getting a lead after having so many poor experiences in the past but to go through that process really broke through something certainly in me, probably in her as well, around realising where we limit ourselves in life, where we have these fears or these beliefs that we can’t do something, yet actually not even trying to do it in the first place or not seeking out the help or advice and this is why I’m such an advocate of coaches and consultants that can actually help you, that have actually been there and done what they teach you to do because unfortunately a lot of coaches out there that don’t and can’t and haven’t but that was about three years ago and we’ve just taken the process we learned, which was a very basic process-

    Renee:

    So your main strategy then is Facebook ads? Is that..?

    Barry:

    Facebook, Instagram, Yeah. We’re now diversifying platforms but we’ve done multiple millions on Facebook and we’re like “Okay, it’s time to start to play around.” So this year we’d been playing with some organic stuff. We’ve done a bunch of stuff on SEO, we’ve done a bunch of videos. I do a video a week, released a blog per se but it’s on a particular subject. We’re doing content across the Instagram, LinkedIn, Facebook and YouTube and we’re starting to see some significant momentum move there and obviously the podcast has been something massive. We haven’t necessarily seen a lot of leads coming directly from the podcast-

    Renee:

    That’s the thing, it’s so hard to track because we’re not capturing email address. So yes, you might have a million downloads but I don’t know who they are.

    Barry:

    Yeah, the thing we noticed though-

    Renee:

    It’s the tricky thing with podcasting isn’t it?

    Barry:

    Yeah, but the interesting thing is anytime my sales team speaks to someone who said, “I’ve listen to the podcast,” they’re pretty much like take my credit card, like we just to work with you guys like what you do is awesome, you’ve got the results. So it’s a very different sale than someone that’s coming from a Facebook ad as well.

    Renee:

    Yes, yeah, yeah, yeah, so it’s a combo strategy. So talk me through the funnel then. So someone sees your Facebook ad then what happens to them?

    Barry:

    Yeah, so we’ve had a very basic setup for a long time now.

    Renee:

    Good! Good because I think there are so many people who think they need to overcomplicate it. Please tell us how simple it is.

    Barry:

    Look, our strategy is super simple like we run ebook campaigns where we take phone numbers, email addresses and two step funnel, second page is like a long form sales copy to opt in to book for a call. We get like 7-8% of people that come through the funnels book a call, which I’ve been told is is pretty high. I don’t know like it’s just what we do so those people book directly into a 15 minute call, which is just basically a call where we really understand who they are, what they’re about. Are they a potential fit? Like what we really want to see is are they a good person to deal with. Like for us, culture in our community is massive.

    We turn away so many people weekly from our community that want to join because to us, having the right community, the right culture creates far more growth than having a lot of people that are paying us a lot of money, not just growth for us, the growth for them and for their business and so we qualify people through that call. Are they a good person? Are they a values fit? Do they know what they want? Do they know when they want it by and do they actually want help achieving it because a lot of people say they want help but aren’t actually willing to do the work.

    Out of all the other people that don’t opt in, we typically call them up. We call up a couple of times to connect in. Just basically see if they want a hand implementing the resources that we’ve sent them through and equally too if once again speaking to them, they seem like a nice enough person and they’re approachable, they’re wanting some form of help, we can then look at offering them an opportunity to book in for that 15 minute call.

    Renee:

    Yeah.

    Barry:

    And so my guys will jump on a 15 minute call, really kind of dive deep on finding out, as deep as you can in 15 minutes, finding out about that potential client. As I said, kind of in the background looking for those kind of fit criteria and if they make those criteria, we’ll book them into an hour call. What we call is the game plan call where you really dive deep on where their business is at, where they want to go.

    Barry:

    We identify one of the biggest problems right now and often it’s not what the prospect thinks like it’s this whole problem symptom thing. It’s like they go to the pharmacist for a Panadol but the headache is not the issue. They’ve pulled their neck out or they’re dehydrated and business is the same. We have a set toolbox of specific models and tools that we use to not only diagnose what the issue is in the business, what requires to be fixed first but actually how to fix that as well.

    Barry:

    Like one of our tools, the profit approach, there’s 347 different strategies we have to grow business that affect kind of five key pillars but we need to know which pillar to work on first and most prospects thinks it’s leads, which is often the last place we look because leads cost money.

    Renee:

    Yep. Yep. Yeah, wow. Super cool and it’s old school and…

    Barry:

    It is old school.

    Renee:

    It’s old school, like phone calls, right?

    Barry:

    Yeah.

    Renee:

    And I think that will play and obviously you’re playing to your strengths as well so that’s obviously a strategy that works well for you because it’s playing to your strengths. I’m guessing that you love having those phone conversations.

    Barry:

    Well, I’m not. I used to, like I don’t do much in the business anymore these days besides presenting at the event, like my team runs the business now without me which-

    Renee:

    Awesome.

    Barry:

    As awkward as it feels, that’s what we teach our clients to do. Like we help our clients are triple their profit, double their time off and build a business that works without them and so 12 months ago I was like, “Oh, I better practise what I preach and remove myself,” and now I’m in a position where I can innovate.

    In terms of the calls, I remember years ago we were told that we’d never be able to hire an outsource team to make those booking calls and I was like, “All right, well watch me.” And we hired local staff and they went, “Okay, we hired an outsource team,” and now like our outsource team nail it. Like their conversion rates, their conversations, the feedback we get from prospects as well is incredible like of how amazing these VA’s are on the phone with them.

    They’re part of my team. You know, they’re full time employees, they’re part of the team, do an outstanding job and any prospect that has an issue with them is probably not right for us anyway because we do leverage outsourced staff, like they’re typically phenomenal what they do. They’re a much cheaper rate than local staff and they want the work, they’re humble, they’re grateful, they appreciate the opportunity to work far more than most Westerners do it. We still hire a fair share of obviously local staff as well but they love the calls because they know that they’re at the front line, I guess pre-vetting and screening people’s whose lives we’re going to change through our programmes.

    Renee:

    Yep. Yeah. Wow. Super cool. So where are your most of your team based?

    Barry:

    We have, I think seven in the Philippines and then we have a one in Perth, one in Brisbane, one in Sydney, two in Melbourne and one in Bali.

    Renee:

    Yep. Wow. All over.

    Barry:

    Yeah.

    Renee:

    Very cool, very cool and okay, so I’m sure this will be interesting to a lot of people who are listening because they’ve, I’m sure struggled with hiring VA’s and knowing how to do that well. So what would you say would be the keys to success in hiring and outsourcing to people like that?

    Barry:

    Look, that’s a great question. Probably use us to hire them. No. Why I say that is-

    Renee:

    So is that part of your business model? You actually hire VAs for your clients?

    Barry:

    Yeah, yeah. So we were fortunate enough we put on a VA a couple of years ago who ran a team of 200 in the Philippines for Walmart and interestingly enough, work from home lifestyle for the Filipinos is very attractive because they’re not in traffic, they’re not stuck in an office. It’s a very different opportunity for them to be able to wake up and jump on their computer and do what they love to do.

    We spent about three years trying to get it right and we hired a lot of dodgy ones and what I mean by that is you can get with VAs, you either get ones that are like absolutely outstanding or ones that just don’t kind cut the mark. They’re not reliable, they always have internet issues or power issues, which does happen sometimes but not as often as sometimes they might say.

    So I think a couple of things, I think first and foremost, you got to be careful hiring them off Upwork and platforms like that but if you’re going to, potentially hire several and have them all complete the same task and then you can look at with a fine tooth comb the whole step of the way. What’s the communication been like, what’s their followup been like, what’s their attention to detail and having hired several at once yes, it’s a bit more money but it saves a lot of time later down the track. You can kind of compare the whole journey and it gives you give a little bit of insight into what to expect with them.

    Yeah, I think that’s a really key as well because it does take a lot of time to onboard a new team member, get them up to speed, make sure they learn the business inside out, back to front, learn the processes and systems and things like that. That’s a big investment for a business owner to do all of that with a new team member so you’ve got to make sure that’s the right person and you would do that if you were hiring locally, you know, you’d interview people and you’d do it. You’ve got to take it as seriously as that.

    Barry:

    Yeah. Yeah. A couple of cases-

    Renee:

    You’re not picking a name out of a hat.

    Barry:

    Yeah. Well there’s the hiring aspect of it but I guess that comes down to what’s your interview process like? Typically I didn’t even really know what our process is like now on the backend of the team development but they go through and do the pre-vetting of everything and then submit three to either myself or my general manager to kind of make the final decision but the onboarding is probably the most important because if I look back three years ago, although I feel that we may be hired some that weren’t suitable, I think actually a lot of the issue was us. We didn’t onboard them properly so we had potentially really great talent but we didn’t onboard them properly which made us feel that we’d hired duds.

    Renee:

    That’s such a massive, massive key for people to really understand because I’ve heard a lot of people complain about the VAs they hired and I’m like you’re the kind of common denominator here and tell me how you’re training these people. Tell me how you’re onboarding them. They’re not mind readers. You can’t expect them to know what is in your brain so yes, I’m so glad you said that.

    Barry:

    Yeah. Well having a clear defined position description but being clear on like if they could just do one task for you in the next month that would be a game changer right, and to some degree mitigate the cost of hiring them. What is that one thing like a mistake a lot of people make is hiring them and giving them everything and they can’t just do everything like we’ve got VAs now, one in particular, she is amazing. She’s all across our website, our portal, all of our tech stuff, our Zapya, she does stuff that boggles my mind yet when we hired her three years ago, she had no tech background, right?

    She’s self taught in all of this but because when we hired her, we hired her for a client care role, we gave her one specific thing to do and then it’s like once she got that up to speed and doing that fantastically, it’s like okay, now this and now this and now this and what happens is you actually teach them how to learn and you teach them how to interact with you and you teach them how to innovate and they become like entrepreneurs. Which entrepreneurs in your organisation where they think for themselves, they can make decisions and they’re not just bean counters like ticking a box every day of the week, you know?

    We are lucky enough that over the last few years we’ve completely systemized our whole entire business where if we have one of our teams sick, another team member can log into their assigner accounts and see absolutely everything that needs to be done for the day like everything’s got to be ticked off, all the processes and systems that would be the how to’s that relate to each of those steps so then to our clients, it’s seemingly-

    Renee:

    Seamless

    Barry:

    There’s no difference. Equally to if we have a staff member leave, we can onboard a new staff member and have them operational in a couple of days as opposed to in the beginning it was like two or three months it took them to get up to speed with even the most basic tasks because we just didn’t have that level of detail in place with the systems but I think the onboarding is the most important. If you hire someone who is a phenomenal culture fit, number one before skillset. They’re are good values fit. They’re easy to get along with. You have great conversations with them. There’s a values alignment and they’re hungry to learn, like game changer.

    If you can then onboard them and be with them and spend time with them and get them up to speed or have a team member spend time with them, that will change your business as opposed to hiring someone who maybe is a great skillset but there’s not values alignment or someone who’s a values alignment without the skill set and you just dump them into the business and say, “Okay, go with your life.”

    Yep. Yep. So, so true, so, so true and I know because when we hired our first overseas VA, we spent, I think my general manager Stevie, she spent probably the first three weeks recording videos on this is how you do this task and like, screen shared and videoed herself doing it and getting all that documentation and it was a painful bloody process. Those few weeks we were just like, “Oh my God, is this worth it?” And yes, now it’s absolutely worth it because yes, if that person ever leaves, we’ve got all that, you know, it is so much faster to onboard a new team member because we’ve got all of those systems documented now and so yeah, absolutely so, so important.

    So okay, we’ve talked about team and systems and leveraging podcasting and having a great funnel, anything else we need to be aware of in terms of scaling our businesses? What did you say that you talk about? You triple your income and double your profit or something?

    Barry:

    Triple their profit and double their time off in 12 months or less, yes. Just to finish off the team thing, so a couple of things to note. Like if you’ve got listeners out there right now that are looking to hire their first team member, often a mistake business owners make is thinking they need to have all the system processes in place.

    Renee:

    Yes.

    Barry:

    So we kind of say there’s five levels of growth that we go through: The startup or the dream up phase, which is like $0 in revenue up to around the 250,000 right. Then you kind of have the startup, which is like 250,000 to 500,000 and then 500,000 to 750,000, 750,000 to 1.2 million and then 1.2 million to 3 million. In that beginning stage between zero and 250,000 the core focus should be around marketing and positioning of a product or service and looking to start to systemize that once you have a proven concept.

    So if you’re bringing a team member on board between that zero to 250,000 or zero to $500,000, it’s not about systemizing the role but as you train them on what is you want them to do, document the training. So if I’m going to show you how to use this thing using screen share software, record it and then get them to actually make the process around that. That was how in the beginning we started documenting systems.

    It’s like I don’t want to do them, I’m not the best person to do them because I’m going to miss steps or way over complicate them so instead I’m going to teach you what I want you to do, you record it and then you create the system and so the only system I created in the beginning was the system for writing systems, which was a document of how to make a system and I’m like, “Go make a system like this off everything that I teach you.” And that was how we started to put them in place to where we have 260, 270 systems now.

    So be careful business owners that want to get things perfect and systemize everything, up until the half a million dollar mark, the way that you deliver your product and service and recruit and finance and all this other stuff is going to change. So don’t waste time on documenting the systemizing that, just systemize the marketing and sales aspect because typically that won’t change; how you go about generating a lead or putting out content or running a sales conversation. That won’t really change. What does change as you scale is how you better leverage the deliverability of your product or your service, how you hire a team, how you manage finances, all that sort of stuff, that does keep changing and evolving up until around the 1.2 million dollar mark if you do it right. Yet we’ve meet a lot of businesses that are doing 5, 6, $7 million and have no systems in place either-

    Renee:

    Ow, that sounds painful.

    Barry:

    Which is painful to go back and put it in so it’s just something to know. A lot of people are like, “Oh I need to get all this in place before hire someone.” No, you need to sell more of your product and service. Hire someone to give you a hand with that and teach them as you go and get them to document it to keep you in your genius zone in those early stages otherwise you get bogged down. This is where a lot of companies don’t get over that half million dollar mark because it gets just too bogged down in complexity, which is not necessary.

    Renee:

    Yeah. Yep. Awesome. Very, very cool. Okay so coming back to my question about we’ve covered the team and the systems and all those bits, anything else that we need to be mastering to scale our businesses?

    Barry:

    Yeah, so I think there’s a couple of things. We have kind of two core tools that we recommend our clients use weekly until they exit their business. The first is what we call the profit approach and it’s staggering how many businesses don’t measure KPIs and this is like the most basic of basic. It’s looking at what’s your lead flow like, what’s your conversion rate like, what’s the average sale of those people coming through and how long they hanging around for. What’s lifetime value and then what’s the profitability and when our clients measure those at a minimum, those key five things for a consistent period of time, we’re able to start to see where the holes in the buckets are and where we need to implement strategies, often several strategies to fix that hole in the bucket.

    A lot of people think “Oh, leads are my issue,” yet when you look at that, it’s like, well, you haven’t got a profitable model. When you start to scale, scale and hire staff or take on board resource or the lifetime value is terrible like we need to find a way for your clients to hang around longer or we need to find a way for your clients to spend more money and there’s often a talk that I do, how we added 5 million to five businesses in five months and it was through these five ways is going through and identifying one particular business, they were losing 1.3 million a year and we said, “Well, you’re doing 56,000 transactions. If we increase the transaction number by, I think it was like $22 or something like that and equated to like 1.29 million.

    I was like, “Do you think if all you focused on for the next year was getting $22 more sale value at the counter, you could do it?” They’re like, “Yeah.” And I was like, “Well, that’s going to be $1.3 million, right?” That one strategy alone so what are three things we can put in place to increase your average sale?

    You have a lot of people are going, well, “Hey, how do I attract more clients?” Which typically costs more money and takes a bunch more time so that profit approach is a very basic tool that we put in place that really I guess, covers the whole business chassis, all the business engine from start to finish from a revenue and a financial perspective. The second tool is what we call as a task audit and this tool is the tool that I created and used every single week until I was operationally free from the business.

    Renee:

    Yep.

    Barry:

    And so it’s just a basic spreadsheet where you document everything that you do, how long it takes you and the frequency in which you do those things. Check emails, reply to emails, write a system, write some Facebook ad copy, whatever it is and then next to it you have docs; do I delegate it, meaning do I give it to someone in my team to do? Is it something that I can delegate? Not necessarily now but at some point in time. Do I outsource it as in do I hire an external marketer? Do I hire an external VA, somebody to outsource this thing to. Do I continue doing it because me as the visionary, as a CEO of the company, it is crucial that I’m on top of this i.e strategic planning, right? Financial health check or do I stop doing it because it’s actually not adding any value and it’s certainly not moving me to where I want to go.

    And so when you categorise them into that, anything that’s in the D or the O like obviously the stock stuff stop it immediately, anything that’s the D or O, then it’s like cool, when am I going to delegate this or outsource it and who’s going to create the system for that? And so what happens, the reason you do these weekly is every time your attention is brought to all this stuff you’re doing, you start to create the behaviour of then passing it off, delegating out of your plate but every time we delegate things, we create space, what do we do?

    Renee:

    Fill it up.

    Barry:

    You go and take on more crap so we do this every week until you start to notice that you’re not filling your time as much and the things that you are doing are super high leverage and they’re the things that you want to be doing because you enjoy doing them.

    Renee:

    Yeah.

    Barry:

    This is a very, very basic tool but we ask our clients to do that every single week until they’re there operationally free because when your attention is brought back to something continuously, I think of that when you get a cut or a graze and you keep knocking it, it gets keeps getting sore and sorer and sorer and sorer and sorer eventually you’re going to do something about it.

    Renee:

    Yep.

    Barry:

    Right? And so we want to bring their attention back to consistently the numbers, like what’s the engine look like in the business and how they’re spending their time and then we have supporting trainings and stuff that help them to set the systems up whether it be generate leads, increasing average sale, whatever the case may be but those two kind of key tools, everything you need from a strategic and a tactical level to grow the business and the only thing missing is then mindset.

    Renee:

    Yeah. How important is that?

    Barry:

    Well, that’s 80% but yet the part that’s missed most by most people.

    Renee:

    Yep. Yep. My accountant will argue with you over that. I should have you both on the show to argue over it.

    Barry:

    This is why accountants don’t my good business coaches and it’s no disrespect but the typical accountant runs a business by looking backwards, right? They’re not financial planners yet most business owners believe an accountant should be running a business moving forwards but they’re trained to look at things backwards and reduce your tax and make sure that you’re compliant.

    Renee:

    Yes.

    Barry:

    Like some great accountants, which there’s not many and there’s no disrespect, some great accountants-

    Renee:

    Mine is a forward thinker.

    Barry:

    Some are forward thinkers, right, and they can look forward. Some are up there with the profit first methodology, which is an incredible methodology for growing profit in any business but mindset like I’ll challenge anyone on it because you could turn up in your business and if you’re pessimistic, if you’re coming from a scarce place, it’s going to significantly affect your risk tolerances and your ability to make the right decisions for your business and you’ll stay stuck being a control freak, never hiring staff because you can’t find anyone to do things as you or staff always let you down or staff rip you off, any of the BS that we’ve heard or that we’ve created will stop you from growing your business.

    Renee:

    Yeah. Do you think it’s more important than in those early days whilst you are operationally hands on because if you think about like your mindset now, if you’re not actually in the day to day running of the business, the business is going to still going to run without you anyway so is your mindset less important?

    Barry:

    No, God no. No, in the beginning when you’re starting up, it’s really about like that whole book, Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway. Right? It’s really about being okay to just take heaps of action and make lots of mistakes.

    Renee:

    Yep.

    Barry:

    I remember a mentor said to me in the earliest days he said, “If you want to grow twice as fast, be prepared to fail twice as quick.” Right, because in the beginning it is a matter of just throwing a whole bunch of stuff at the wall and seeing what sticks. There’s a lot less risks, so you can do that. When you’re running a multimillion dollar company, you can’t be that frivolous. You can’t just throw a bunch of stuff in the wall and hope something sticks, you know? You’ve got people’s livelihoods, you’ve got a lot of turnover. You’ve got supplier invoices. Very quickly the business can tank.

    Barry:

    It’s as important the whole way through. You know, the biggest thing that stops our clients from building a business that works without them, is not implementing systems or KPIs or marketing strategies because, let’s be honest, you can find all that stuff on YouTube, you really can, right? Equally to that, that’s half the challenge is there’s so much conflicting information and the business side believe that they need to be doing a million strategies to generate leads rather than one or two that work consistently that they can focus their time on and yet the thing that stops most business owners creating a business that works without them is their mindset because they have the systems in place yet in order for them to actually step out and have the business work without them, they have to shift their identity, right?

    Barry:

    If this is something that we can conceptualise what that actually means but doing it is far different because you take a business owner out of their business where they’d been working 40, 50, 60, 70 hours a week for years and all of a sudden put them in a situation where they don’t need to do that anymore and nothing relies on them and there’s a massive freak out that goes on because they’re trained and condition to be…

    Renee:

    Who am I without all this work to do.

    Barry:

    Yep, and what happens is they unconsciously or consciously sabotage the business to validate that the business needs them.

    Renee:

    That it needs them.

    Barry:

    That it needs them and so the biggest shift in that move as it is in any move of business is your mindset. Like your business will never outgrow you and I honestly believe we never have business problems, we have personal problems that get expressed through our business.

    Renee:

    Yep. Yep. Agreed. Agreed, yep and it’s so interesting because there’s are so many parallels between being a business owner and being a parent as well because as you were saying that it’s kind of like you take your kid off to school and you’re kissing them goodbye and you know your handing over that child to someone else and it’s like you’ve got to step back now.

    Barry:

    Yeah. That first day of school

    Renee:

    Similar thing when you kind of handing over a task to a team member it’s like okay.

    Barry:

    Yeah.

    Renee:

    Yeah. Can you step back and not be the helicopter parent?

    Barry:

    Yeah and you got to be prepared that your business is not going to look the same. Right? Like if you step back, mistakes are going to happen that maybe you wouldn’t make but the bigger picture is you can grow a business that works without you.

    Renee:

    Yeah. That’s right.

    Barry:

    You can grow a business where you could be off for a month on holidays somewhere in the world with your family without your phone turned on and still make money.

    Renee:

    Yep, yeah.

    Barry:

    Still serve clients, still be making a difference.

    Renee:

    It’s like your business becomes a teenager, you know they’re going to fuck up and make mistakes because that’s what a teenager does but you’ve got to trust that you’re going to be there to support them through that and so that they’re going to be functioning adults.

    Barry:

    Yeah.

    Renee:

    Yeah.

    Barry:

    And and look, most entrepreneurs are control freaks like honestly like we are.

    Renee:

    It doesn’t work in parenting and it doesn’t work in business.

    Barry:

    Yep. It’s costing you growth in your business.

    Renee:

    Yeah.

    Barry:

    Like your inability to be behaviour flexible and let go and I look now like I remember a mentor said to me two years ago, he said, “Barry, it should be your goal to be the most unreliable person in your business.” And I was like, “What?!?” Like that was like the complete opposite of what I felt. I’m like, “What? … Why?!”

    Renee:

    That’s a very uncomfortable thing for me to hear.

    Barry:

    And now I look back and go shit I’m actually the most unreliable person in my company, which means my team don’t come to me for the answers. They’re trained and there’s enough leadership within them and within the company that they go elsewhere. It doesn’t mean that I’m not involved, doesn’t mean that I’m not still very much involved in the direction of the company, my role is different.

    My role now is where are we in the next 10 years, the next 20 years, next 30 years. What’s that vision? What’s the innovation? And to take those ideas back to my integrator or back to my GM and have her create plans and structures to allow the team to execute on that, to steer the ship forwards. You know, someone needs to look outside of the ship at the weather patterns and the weather conditions. They can’t just be on the end of the steering wheel looking straight ahead.

    Renee:

    Yeah. Yeah. Very cool. Very cool. I’m sure we could talk all day Barry but we’re going to need to wrap it up so if people want to find out more about who you are and what they do, where can they go?

    Barry:

    Thegamechangers.com.au. Equally to jump onto our podcast, the Comeback Game on iTunes, Spotify and any of the podcasting platforms.

    Renee:

    Awesome sauce. Thank you so, so much for being on the show. It’s been lots of fun to chat with you, awesome.

    Barry:

    Yeah, thanks for having me.

    Renee:

    My pleasure. All right you’ve been listening to Leveraged and Loving It, I’m Renee Hasseldine and I’ll talk to you next week.


    renee-b&W webRenée Hasseldine works with coaches, experts & thought leaders to turn what is in their brilliant minds into powerful signature systems using visual models. Her knack for extracting and unpacking thoughts and turning them into unique intellectual property is sheer genius.

    Renée is the author of the best-selling book ‘Share Your Passion’, she is the host of the ‘Leveraged and Loving It’ podcast and a panel member on The Business Playroom TV.

    FREE TRAINING REVEALS:

    The 4 visual models that let you work less & convert more leads

    Get instant access now plus regular tips for thought leaders

    You have Successfully Subscribed!

    FREE TRAINING REVEALS:

    The 4 visual models that let you work less & earn more

    Get instant access now plus regular tips for thought leaders

    You have Successfully Subscribed!

    FREEWEBINAR REVEALS:

    HOW TO NAIL YOUR MESSAGE & GET MORE CLIENTS

    You have registered

    B3:

    WEEKLY BUSINESS TIPS WITH RENEE HASSELDINE

    You have registered!

    FREE SCALING UP SCORECARD

    Uncover your scalability strengths & weaknesses today

    Get instant access now plus regular tips for thought leaders

    You have Successfully Subscribed!